Medieval Theatricals from Churches to Merchant and Craft Guilds

The Christian church banned Roman theatricals, introduced liturgical drama into its services years later, and eventually permitted guilds to manage them. By the 9th century, church bishops permitted brief chanted or sung insertions in services as a means of propagating the faith among the mostly-illiterate populace. Theatrical Church Presentations Presentations in Latin (the universal language … Read moreMedieval Theatricals from Churches to Merchant and Craft Guilds

Isabella and Francesco Andreini of Commedia dell’Arte Gelosi

Isabella Andreini, playwright and prima donna, and comic Francesco Andreini performed with commedia dell’arte’s foremost company, the Gelosi. Early companies of commedia dell’arte comprised all-male groups with men portraying women, but in the mid-16th century they introduced actresses to their audiences despite sharp criticisms and attempts to ban them. The first to gain prominence and … Read moreIsabella and Francesco Andreini of Commedia dell’Arte Gelosi

Shakespeare and the Globe Theatre Actors and Performances

William Shakespeare was an actor and co-owner at the Globe Theatre. “Julius Caesar” was likely the first of his plays performed in the new venue. The famous playhouse which opened in 1599 is often referred to as the Shakespeare Globe Theatre. Shakespeare and The Globe Theatre Investment Located near the Thames River in Southbank, The … Read moreShakespeare and the Globe Theatre Actors and Performances

Blackfriars Theatre in Renaissance London

A monastery built in 1278 by Dominican monks was closed in 1538 by Henry VIII, used as site of two theatres, and permanently closed in 1642 by Puritans. Blackfriars Theatre was named in reference to monks’ vestments. Located near the Thames River in London, England, it was a ‘liberty’ property (within the city walls, but … Read moreBlackfriars Theatre in Renaissance London

Performer Catherine Clive of Drury Lane: British Theatrical Stage Actress in London, England

Catherine “Kitty” Clive was a prime audience favorite during her forty years on the British stage. Catherine Clive was born in London, England in 1711, daughter of William Raftor of Kilkenny, Ireland. The Dictionary of Irish Biography (1988) shows that she was born in Ulster. That is unlikely, however, as her father fled to France … Read morePerformer Catherine Clive of Drury Lane: British Theatrical Stage Actress in London, England

16th Century London Theatrical Venues: Stages for Touring Theatre Companies Developed at Inn Yards

Queen Elizabeth fully supported the theatre but the London politicians did not, so traditional venues were utilized by acting companies. The Queen enjoyed the plays and pageants and encouraged new English playwrights. She was patron of an acting company that comprised the best actors from several troupes. Acting Companies and London Theatres Performers were considered … Read more16th Century London Theatrical Venues: Stages for Touring Theatre Companies Developed at Inn Yards

Roman Comedy Elaborated in the Works of Plautus and Terence

Roman Comedy borrowed heavily from its Greek counterpart, however, the Roman Comedians made substantial changes and created a poper Roman style of Comedy. The two Roman playwrights who best illustrate the New Comedy that had developed somewhat at an earlier period in Greece (336-250) are Plautus and Terence. Although there are no surviving Greek originals … Read moreRoman Comedy Elaborated in the Works of Plautus and Terence